Word Nerd

Word Nerd: Xyst

Xyst is a covered portico, as a promenade (in ancient Greek and Roman architecture) or a garden walk planted with trees (in an ancient Roman villa). Xyst (pronounced zist) first started being used around 1655 or so and derives from the Latin xystus (garden terrace/shaded walk) and the Greek xystós (a covered colonnade). Xyst, besides… Continue reading Word Nerd: Xyst

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Word Nerd: Sough

Sough as a verb means to moan, murmur, or sigh, while Sough as a noun means a sighing, rustling, or murmuring sound. Sough originates with the Old English swōgan (to make a noise), which is kin to the Gothic gaswogjan (to groan). Sough is one of those absolutely lovely descriptive words that I feel should… Continue reading Word Nerd: Sough

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Word Nerd: Furtive

Furtive is behaving secretly and quietly to avoid being noticed. Furtive originates with the Latin word fur (thief), which in turn may have originated with the Greek phōr (thief). Furtive was first used in the English language in the early 17th century and it meant "done in a way so as not to be seen".… Continue reading Word Nerd: Furtive

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Word Nerd: Lackadaisical

Lackadaisical is a lack of care, spirit, zest, or involvement. Lackadaisical derives from the 17th century use of lackaday, which derives from the longer "alack the day". In the mid-1700s the suffix -ical was added to lackaday and thus lackadaisical was formed. Lackadaisical belongs to a lovely grouping of words that describe a lack of… Continue reading Word Nerd: Lackadaisical

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Word Nerd: Reverie

Reverie is a state of absent-minded, abstracted daydreaming or musing. Reverie derives from the Old French resverie (revelry) which derives from resver and rever (to wander, be delirious, to rave). Reverie is an absolutely lovely word. To fall into reverie is to be lost in a dreamy, pleasant, fanciful thoughtscape. Reverie takes daydreaming to a… Continue reading Word Nerd: Reverie

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Word Nerd: Elysian

Elysian is a blissful, divine state of being. Elysian comes from classical Greek Mythology in the form of Elysium or Elysian Fields or the abode of the blessed after death. In this form, Elysian was first used around 1579. Elysian used as an adjective describing a blissful, peaceful state was first used in Shakespeare's Henry… Continue reading Word Nerd: Elysian